2011: A Year of Omelettes

Well, what can I say? This year I made a ton of omelettes. Below you will find what I consider to be, at this point in my life, the optimal way to make an omelette. Surely I will learn more about omlettemakery in the coming years, but for now, the best advice/insight I have to offer is below.

Before we get to all that. Here is one of my best omelettes of 2011.

the last omelette of 2011

the last omelette of 2011

 

The Essentials

- Eggs should be fresh and warmed to room temperature.
- I prefer a shallow non-stick pan, but I’ve also used cat iron.
- Rubber spatula
- A pad of butter

Below is the most important video to watch if you’re serious about learning how to make an omelette.

I don’t make my omelettes exactly the way Julia does, but I strive to remember:
- Don’t over beat the eggs.
- Use plenty of butter and evenly distribute it as it melts in the pan.
- Work quickly. Once the eggs are on, swirl the pan a bit, distribute the ingredients, and get the omelette on the plate ASAP.

Fillings

I don’t care how you do it – borrow, swap, steal, or purchase – but acquire fresh ingredients and then think carefully about preparation. You want everything ready to go once the eggs are on the pan. Typically I either blanch, saute, or steam vegetables. Here are some of my favorite fillings with notes about how I prepare them:
- Avocado: thinly sliced
- Cherry f’ing tomatoes: cut into half or thirds
- Onions: Cut thinly, caramelized in oil or butter using a touch of sugar
- Mushrooms : all varieties, definitely pre-cooked, usually sautéed in some oil
- Goat cheese: hands-down the best cheese to put inside your omelette. Crumble it or chop it coarsely.
- Pork: everything tastes better with pork. Prosciutto, deli ham, pancetta, and bacon will all work. Pre-cooked, obvi.

mushrooms

mushrooms

 


Construction

Below is a step-by-step guide for constructing an omelette. It is important to be prepared, stay calm, and work quickly. No shortcuts.

  1. Make sure your fillings are fully prepared and are reachable from the spot you will stand to cook your omelette. You might want to take a second to think about the order in which you will add the ingredients.
  2. Rub a small amount of oil (I use olive) evenly into your pan and begin warming the pan at medium heat level. In the meantime:
  3. Crack 2-3 eggs in bowl and add about a tablespoon of warm water. Whisk until just mixed.
  4. Put a pad of butter into the pan and swirl it around until it is evenly distributed.
  5. Pour the eggs into the pan and leave them alone for 15-20 seconds.
  6. Using a spatula, push the edges of the omelette gently towards the center of the pan. Swirl the pan to get the uncooked egg from the middle of the pan to the edges.
  7. Add your cheese to one half of the pan. In about 10 seconds you should have a solid base for your omelette.
  8. Layer the remaining fillers over the cheese.
  9. The omelette is ready when there is just a thin top layer of shiny, slightly undercooked egg visible.
  10. I prefer to slide my omelette off the pan and onto the plate without using a spatula.

Seasoning

I like to add sea salt and freshly ground black pepper to my omelette once it’s on the plate. I also recommend using a little bit of hot sauce such as Frank’s.

a slightly browned omelette

a slightly browned omelette

an omelette cooked in a cast iron pan

an omelette cooked in a cast iron pan

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